Lake Norden High School Class of 1926

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LAKE NORDEN HIGH SCHOOL BULLETIN

A Word to Patrons and Parents

At the west end of Main Street stands the new public high school building, the stateliest structure of all that grace our fair little city. It is ample evidence of the faith that you, the good citizens of Lake Norden, have in popular education. As patrons and parents it is only right therefore that you should know how we, teachers and pupils, are keeping faith with you, and what we may do further in cooperation with the Board of Education to make this institution all it ought to be. We do it with the more eagerness because we know desirable standards cannot be attained to, the best results of school work cannot be secured unless parents and people in general in the community are aware of some of the aims and objectives set by the state for a four-year accredited high school and are willing to assist in gaining them. For a better understanding of the schools and their problems, there is no agency like that of a Parent-Teacher Association. We take this opportunity to extend an invitation to all who are interested in the welfare of the youth of our community to meet with us and take part in the work of the local association. There you will have an opportunity to meet the teachers of your children, to get their point of view and to give them yours. As a teacher begins to appreciate the thought and care, you have given, the hopes and aims you have, your success of failure in the home life, there will be more sympathetic understanding, more intelligent cooperation on the part of the school. You will perhaps also come to understand the State requirements, the course of study, a little better. It is not altogether reasonable to expect pupils who have spent only a few months in high school to be authorities on what a high school ought to be. No doubt they give you their opinion of changes that ought to be made. Their opinion may change too with the years as ours has. We are not expecting anything unreasonable, but what boys and girls can generally do elsewhere throughout the Northwest our boys and girls, descendAnts from the most hardy races from Northern Europe, ought to be able to do. It is negligent on the part of parents to send a pupil to school and not make any inquiry as to how the child succeeds during the school year. The monthly report card does not state the whole story. It does not say anything about how your children spend their evenings when school is not in session. It is your business to know, It is not

LAKE NORDEN HIGH SCHOOL BULLETIN

enough in our day that we examine the teacher’s license to teach. What about the license on the automobile that the careless young folks from distant communities hire for an hour of amusement? If our young folks are to meet and mingle with them it would be wise to know what they stand for. It is not enough that the best of textbooks are provided in the school; parents ought to know what kind of magazines and books the children read during leisure hours as well. The need for watchfulness along these lines may ap-ply to only a very few at present, but from experience we know there is often a leveling down to the youth who has no home influence to assist him rather than vice versa. It is the duty not only of every parent and guardian but of every good citizen to help create such an environment as will help the young folks to go right. If we who are older seek only the gratification of pleasure and material prosperity, showing A hap-py-go-lucky lack of concern for the welfare of youth and righteousness, some day we shall suf-fer for it. We thank you for the opportunity that has been ours this year, and we trust as your children now return to you that they have made reasonable progress, even such as may count in wisdom and in favor with God and men. We deem it a priv-ilege to be your co-workers in the highest inter-ests of the school. May the institution flourish and become a still greater factor for good in this community than it has been in the past. We are eager to meet the needs for high school training if possible, not only of Lake Norden but of all its surrounding districts and shall work. towards that goal.

Rules of Sportsmanship 1.—Show courtesy to your opponents—be gen-tlemen and ladies and treat opponents as such. 2.—Play the game according to the spirit of the rules—play fair. 3.—Abide by the decision of the referee with-out remarks or heckling. 4.—Be courageous losers but do not give up when the score goes against you. Play your best to the end—have grit. 5.—Be a modest winner. Do not boast of vic-tories or “rub it in.” Cheer your opponents—ap-plaud good plays on both teams. Take pride in upholding the good spirit of your school.

Late to bed and late to class—these are the students that never pass.

LAKE NORDEN HIGH SCHOOL BULLETIN

Improvements in tile Scaolastiec Organization

Although our educational program must ever adapt itself to changing ,Conditions in general andl local needs in particular, whatever is of per-manent value ought to be kept. Be it in program or policy, radical changes overnight seldom build pp anything worthwhile in the community. We have had, and have, plenty of frills and fads in education in our day. The interest in these is fast fading however and the general trend seems to be towards the practical things, towards thor-oughness in essentials rather than a smattering of everything that an extravagant people may chance to clamor for. Our efforts during the year have, for that reason, been mainly directed to-ward strengthening the courses already offered instead of adding new ones. We have tried to raise the scholarship, to fortify ourselves where it was found we were weakest. Because of these developments some changes, which we shall briefly mention, had to be made in organization. To make the recess periods more profitable to all, to teach games and to fix responsibility for what takes place on the play grounds, a member of the faculty in the grades was assigned to playground duties for a week out every school month. To insure better order in the different parts of the school building, and in pass-ing to and from rooms, a teacher has been placed on hall duty for such periods as needed. A permanent record of each pupil’s scholarship, even in the grades, is required by the State. A card system showing such record and other desired in-formation has been installed this year. The Board of Education has also purchased a safe where all valuable papers and records of school work may be kept. As nothing perhaps contributes so much to good class work as a well-planned lesson, lesson plan books have been put into use in the grades. The daily programs, too, have been changed so as to give more time to the more essential studies. Monthly reports of grades, formerly sent to the County Superintendent’s office, are now checked with the papers upon which they are based, here at the office. This enables the superintendent to see, without giving special tests, what kind of work both teacher and pupil are doing. Our high school library has been moved into the Assembly Room where it is available at all times.

LAKE NORDEN HIGH SCHOOL BULLETIN

The books have been classified and catalogued. Fiction for outside reading in the English courses has almost been doubled in number. a ic-tionaries for the high school have also chased. A system for checking out 1ibr on a student’s indivival card has been devised. Our Board of Education decided early this year to adopt free text books in the high school for the coming five year period. The leading texts were carefully examined to find out which ones were best fitted to our needs and the State course of study before any selections were made. As a re-sult Lake Norden has one of the Most up-to-date and Vest text lists to be found in any high school. Bookmen and others in a position to know have commented favorably on our text book adaptions. Where ever any marked deficiency has been found in a high school student’s preparatory sub-jects, we have tried to remedy the condition as much as possible by review classes. Much work of this nature has had to be done in grammar apd arithmetic, for instance. Special classes have also been conducted in the, high school in spelling and penmanship. As thoroughness of preparation in the common branches before one enters high school enables the pupil to benefit to a much greater extent from the high school course, it is hoped that all con-cerned will strive to that end.

In order to be healthy a person must be ath-letic. One might argue that a person is athletic because he is healthy in the first place and at-tribute his health to some other cause but never-theless the two go hand-in-hand and where one takes the lead the other usually follows. Alice Burkshardt, judged the healthiest girl in the United States, 95.7 per cent perfect, plays tennis, and basket ball, swims, rides horseback, and works on the farm, and these according to her are responsible for her health. This proves the importance of school athletics in health building for girls. George Cuskaden, in the same contest was judged the healthiest boy in the United States and is 97.7 per cent perfect. George was a mem-ber of his high school basket ball team and base-ball teams, and ran on the track team.

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Basket ball has taken marked strides forward during the past year in the Lake Norden High School. The student body have shown more in-terest than heretofore and the people about town are giving their support. The boys’ team this year was made up of prac tically all new material with the exception of George Larson who had had two years experi-ence. The boys were all young and small and this of course was a great handicap to them against heavier and more rangy opponents. George Larson was elected captain early in the season and was Lake Norden’s stellar player in many of their games. Being handicapped by size and experience the boys were not ,able to turn in a majority of wins but gave a good account of themselves in all games played. Most of them were lost by small knargins. Worth mentioning here is the fact that they were able to turn in a win over the much cel-ebrated Hayti five on the hatter’s home court. The game was hard fought and close throughout as is indicated by the score: 12 to 11. The team was at its best at this time. Clarence Anderson played opposite George Larson at forward; Robert Rich-ardson held the pivote position; and Carl Tulson and August Hurmi guarded.. Alvin Tuohino, Ver-ner Frantz, Ray Berg and Marvin, Ellsworth were on the bench. Captain Larson is the only one we lose this year by graduation so we look forward to a much stronger and more seasoned team next year.

Early in the year a girl’s team was doubtful due to the lack of candidates for the squad but toward the ‘end of the year more girls became in-terested in the sport and we expect many new prodigies to push the regulars for their berths next year. Thelma Kangas captained the girls team and Florence Hanson was their manager. The girls team put in a successful season win-ning the majority of their games. The team play and shooting improved wonderfully during’ the year and all indications point to a team of high calibre next year. The girls went into the finals at the county tournament held at Bryant by de-feating Estelline for the third time in the year The final game with Hayti was a thriller and was nobody’s game until the final whistle which caught Hayti on the long end of a 25 to 18 count. The girls also lose just one player. Elmi Juntti graduates and leaves one guard position vacant. Alice Juso, Harriet Tulson, and Aune Aho were the offensive trio and Thelma Kangas, Ruth Lee, and Elmi Juntti carried the brunt of the defense. Florence Hanson and Eleanor Kangas were subs. Clara, S. Goplin coached the girls and was as-sisted by Russell J. Bignall the latter part of the year. Russell J. Bignall coached the boys. Lake Norden has adopted a plan of awarding letters and honorary sweaters according to the percentage of games played. The seniors will. re-ceive sweaters and the under-classmen will re-ceive letters. George L4rson and Elmi Juntti received honorary sweaters this year. The fol-lowing received letters: Aune Aho, Clarence An-derson, Florence Hanson, August Hurmi, Alice Juso, Thelma K,a,ngas, Ruth Lee, Robert Richard-son, Harriet Tulson, Carl Tulson and Alvin Tuo-hino.

LAKE NORDEN HIGH SCHOOL BULLETIN

Lake Norden Welcomes You

A goodly number have already signified their intention of entering Lake Norden High in Sep-ember. Will you be among them? The opportunity is yours to study at home in a fully accredited tour-your high school. Here you may Tend your high school years with those who later n life will be your neighbors and associates. The Lake Norden High School is better equipped than ever to offer a strong general course. Such commercial subjects as can be taught to an advantage n a smaller high school are offered at Lake Norden. This department is also now well establish-KI and in charge of a teacher of actual business experience. Among the extra curricular- activities o be stressed next year arb: – Dramatics, Public ;peaking, Debate, Music And Physical Education. f possible a Glee Club will be organized. Much ►f the work along literary lines will be carried In through the literary society of our school. I believe there will be a great opportunity for service and success knocking at the door of the routh of the Northwest. When the call comes, vill you be ready to Answer? A high school course will enable you to respond in a creditable manner. You have ,perhaps read of $10,000 positions seeking men. Do you, like many, think it is a matter of only “good luck,” “good fortune,” o be elected to such positions? If you should in-Luire, you will find that, the so-called “good fortune” came to the successful candidate because he [ad prepared to do the service the position called or. Preparation is the only thing that will enable you to hear the call of opportunity and give you he courage to answer. A person’s opportunity 3 equal, to his preparation. If unprepared Society not likely to offer him an opportunity. Another thing is certain: whether you decide to espare further for your life work or not, you Till have to compete, no matter what line you nter, with young folks who have prepared. While a high school education may not then al-lays place you in a position of marked advantage, the lack of such training is sure to place ou in a position of marked disadvantage. In fact eighth grade graduates are barred from entering pon many lines of work that formerly were open ) them. Why not call at the Superintendent’s office then in town and talk the matter over. We shall e glad to do everything we can to help you ,ar-Inge for a course at Lake Norden.

The Class 0f 1926

FLORENCE HANSON “Molly” —Sunny disposition and an ever ready smile. Complet-ed her last two years of nigh school work here. Class Secretary during her Junior year ; President during Sen-ior year. Business Manager Girls Basket Ball Team.

ANNA WAHALA “Annie”—In-dustry and ability in a rare combination. Completed four years of High School here. An asset to the Class. Treas-urer in Junior year and se-lected Salutatorian.

CHESTER BERGERSON “Check” —Like gravity he has the power of attraction! Com-pleted four years of High School work here. Was twice Class President—in his Soph-omore and Junior years.

Elmi Juntti A genial disposition and an entertaining line of chatter! Completed her entire High School course in Lake Norden. Played guard on the Girls Basket Ball team Awarded sweater and mono-gram during Senior year.

EINAR SVARVARI “Li/tit/RS”— A personality all his own. Completed four years of High School work here. An active member and has held a class office every year. Se-lected Valedictorian in Sen-ior year.

‘ESTHER TILLBERG — Charm, Wisdom, Grace. What more could be desired? Esther enrolled here during the last semester of her Senior year. Attended at Sioux Falls pre-vious to that. A good student and an active Class member.

GEORGE LARSON “Lars” — A quiet, unassuming boy ; but woks are deceiving! Com-pleted four years of High schccl work here. Active in athletics. Two years Cap-tain Boys Basket Ball team. Awarded sweater and mon-ogram in Senior year.

FLORENCE HENDRICKSON “Flo” —The only way to have friends is to be one! Flor-ence combleted the last year of her high school course in Lake Norden after attending at Estelline the first three years.

LAKE NORDEN HIGH SCHOOL BULLETIN
EN ROLLM ENT
SENIORS Chester Bergerson Florence Hanson Florence Hendrickson Elmi Juntti George Larson Fern Stark Einar Svarvari Esther Tillberg Anna Wahala
JUNIORS Minnie Fedt Alice Juso Gibson Larson Ruth Lee Robert Richardson Lila Stolpe Carl Tulson Thelma Tuohino
SOPHOMORES —Aune Aho -Clarence Anderson William Antonen -Raymond Berg Marvin Ellsworth Verner Frantz Ernest Geranen Florence Jacobson Edward Johnston Thelma Kangas Ellen Savela Mildred Stolpe Ralph Swanson. Harriet Tulson Alvin Tuohino Ellen Wayrynen
FRESHMEN Lawrence Bergerson Alice Hedblad August Hurmi Eleanor Kangas Earl Kaski Otto Olson Laila Pietila Myrtle Svarvari
LAKE NORDEN HIGH SCHOOL BULLETIN
Value of a High. School Education
What may be expected from a high school graduate? Benefits derived from taking a high school course, same as any other, vary ; neverthe-less there are some things that all graduates ought to gain in a more or less marked degree. First of all, I think a high school graduate ought to be able to be able to reason fairly well. Ability to think straight is perhaps the one great objective sought. We do not mean here by Think-ing the mere training of the intellect with a view to insight. The old book says. “As a man thinketh in his heart so is he”—continues he to be. We cannot think very long without some emotional element entering into our thought life ; in fact, we are guided to greater extent by our emotions than pure intellect. It is therefore essential that our emotional nature be trained. In our day, when there is so little outward restraint brought to bear on the teen-age child, it is the more essen-tial that an inward control, an emotional balance, should be established. In training to think, then, there must also be the training of the emotions and the will. It is a known fact that the smaller schools have and are the more likely to develop independent thinkers of this type. This was fully proved dur-ing the World war. In fact it has been admitted by educational leaders that a smaller institution can outstrip a larger in quality of work so long as it concentrates on a proper program. The danger in a smaller institution is in that of divid-ing its efforts, scattering its energy Along too many lines. Secondly, I think a high school ought to and does enlarge one’s capacity for enjoyment of life. “Understanding is a well spring of joy to him that has it.” A person may make money without much academic training, but such a, person would not have any interests outside of making money. When such a person plans to retire what has he to look forward to? There can be, should be, no leisure unless one has prepared for it. Of course it is not absolutely necessary to attend school in order to acquire some of the ends sought in education. There are persons of such rare faculty of mind that they have accomplished without any guides what others gained in school. One may even learn to make shoes by himself,

LAKE NORDEN HIGH SCHOOL BULLETIN

ENROLLM ENT

SENIORS Chester Bergerson Florence Hanson Florence Hendrickson Elmi Juntti George Larson Fern Stark Einar Svarvari Esther Tillberg Anna Wahala

JUNIORS Minnie Fedt Alice Juso Gibson Larson Ruth Lee Robert Richardson Lila Stolpe Carl Tulson Thelma Tuohino

SOPHOMORES —Aune Aho -Clarence Anderson William Antonen -Raymond Berg Marvin Ellsworth Verner Frantz Ernest Geranen Florence Jacobson Edward Johnston Thelma Kangas Ellen Savela Mildred Stolpe Ralph Swanson. Harriet Tulson Alvin Tuohino Ellen Wayrynen

FRESHMEN Lawrence Bergerson Alice Hedblad August Hurmi Eleanor Kangas Earl Kaski Otto Olson Laila Pietila Myrtle Svarvari

LAKE NORDEN HIGH SCHOOL BULLETIN

Value of a High. School Education

What may be expected from a high school graduate? Benefits derived from taking a high school course, same as any other, vary ; neverthe-less there are some things that all graduates ought to gain in a more or less marked degree. First of all, I think a high school graduate ought to be able to be able to reason fairly well. Ability to think straight is perhaps the one great objective sought. We do not mean here by Think-ing the mere training of the intellect with a view to insight. The old book says. “As a man thinketh in his heart so is he”—continues he to be. We cannot think very long without some emotional element entering into our thought life ; in fact, we are guided to greater extent by our emotions than pure intellect. It is therefore essential that our emotional nature be trained. In our day, when there is so little outward restraint brought to bear on the teen-age child, it is the more essen-tial that an inward control, an emotional balance, should be established. In training to think, then, there must also be the training of the emotions and the will. It is a known fact that the smaller schools have and are the more likely to develop independent thinkers of this type. This was fully proved dur-ing the World war. In fact it has been admitted by educational leaders that a smaller institution can outstrip a larger in quality of work so long as it concentrates on a proper program. The danger in a smaller institution is in that of divid-ing its efforts, scattering its energy Along too many lines. Secondly, I think a high school ought to and does enlarge one’s capacity for enjoyment of life. “Understanding is a well spring of joy to him that has it.” A person may make money without much academic training, but such a, person would not have any interests outside of making money. When such a person plans to retire what has he to look forward to? There can be, should be, no leisure unless one has prepared for it. Of course it is not absolutely necessary to attend school in order to acquire some of the ends sought in education. There are persons of such rare faculty of mind that they have accomplished without any guides what others gained in school. One may even learn to make shoes by himself,

for instance. A teacher, however, may enable the same person to do better, and master the trade with more economy of time. If one campares the salaries of high school graduates with those of eight grade graduates, the value of a high school course becomes ap-parant. No lesser an authority than a former Commissioner of Education states that “while a common school education increases the earning capacity of an individual 50 per cent, a high education increases it 100 per cent. A careful survey has shown that a high school education is worth as much to a farmer as a $6000.00 note at five precent interest.” What is more important, education makes for leadership, as it gives personal power. In every community, club and society leaders are needed. Other things being equal, the person with an ed-ucation will be given the position of leadership. This for no other reason than that he has larger interests- more developed powers, the attention and confidence of himself and others. To quote Van Dyke: “The power to see clearly, imagine vividly, to think independently, to will nobly, is his. The true end of education is creative, in being’ not in -,ettincr, in developing one’s powers and. faculties.” It is in the development of char-acter that education has its greatest possibilities. The only real wealth in a community after all is that of true manhood, of nobility, of integrity, of square dealing of hopefulness cheerfulness, the fear and love of God, and goodwill toward fellow rr en.

Education is the making of better life, mentally, morally, socially, and physically. Ptiysical edu-cation is an effective means of accomplishing this so can well be included in the school curriculum. Next year we expect to teach Physical Education to both boys and girls as a regular school course. This will give opportunity to all to t4e part in some physical activity. Heretofore only the select were given this opportunity as basket ball was all that was offered. If athletics are to be regarded as a, means of promoting physical development, health, standards of square dealing, good sports-manship, and clean, alert minds, then the many rather than the few must be reached.

LAKE NORDEN HIGH SCHOOL BULLETIN

The Stuff That Counts

The test of a man is the fight he makes, The grit that he daily shows; The way he stands on his feet and takes Fate’s numerous bumps and blows. A coward can smile when there’s naught to fear, When nothing his progress bars, But it takes a man to stand up and cheer, While some other fellow stars.

It isn’t the victory after all, But the fight that a brother makes; The man, who, driven, against the wall, Still stands up erect and takes The blows of fate with his head held high, Bleeding, and bruised, and pale, Is the man who will win in the by and by For he isn’t afraid to fail.

It’s the bumps you get, and the jolts you get, And the shock that your courage stands, The hours of sorrow and ruin regret, The prize that escapes the hands, That test your mettle and prove your worth, It isn’t the blows you deal, But the blows you take on the good old’ earth, That shows if your stuff is real. —The Three Partners.

“When the One Great Scorer comes, To write against, your name. He writes—not that you won or lost But how you played the game.” —Charles A. Lee.

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