Election 2020 VOTE

My grandfather, Andrea’s Christian Olson Hoel, was born in Tromso, Norway, in 1860. He came to America with his Father Ole, mother Johanna, and brother Gideon in 1890. Johanna died giving birth to their son Olaf in 1890.
They made their first home in America at Calumet, Michigan, where Ole worked in the copper mines. The boys also worked there as soon as they were old enough.

Grandfather Andrew left Michigan and went to Northern Minnesota to work in the iron mines. He met and married his wife, Minnie Wirta, at Bovey, Minnesota. He continued working there until their daughter Alice was born. Andrew and Minnie, with baby Alice, moved to Dakota territory. Uncle Simon came to America and settled near Lake Poinsett Dakota Territory it 1873. He and his wife spent their first winter living in a Dugout on the side of a hill southeast of Lake Poinsett. The following year a sod house got built. Simon’s uncle Ole helped him build a stone house in 1880, part of that house is still standing. Andrew came to the Dakota territory to help his uncle Simon on the farm as Simon didn’t have any sons. He had five daughters.

Andrew and Minnie rented a farm near Simons, where they made their home for the next 40 years, and their son Frank, my father, was born, and they had another daughter named Elma.
They lived in a sod house first. It was later covered with wood, creating walls two feet thick. Their income from that small farm was not a large amount of, money from selling cream and eggs, a few pigs in the fall, or calves. They usually traded cream and eggs for groceries in town and sold a small grain each fall.

When the stock market crashed, and the banks closed, my grandfather lost all the money that he had saved in the Bank. He was a proud Democrat and incredibly pleased to be an American citizen. It is somewhat ironic that the bank president who locked the doors and kept Grandpa’s money was a Republican. He was also a friend of grandfathers. Those were different times; some democrats and Republicans considered themselves friends and could talk and work together. We cannot say the same thing today as our society has become hostile and hateful.

In 1929 the Wall Street Stock market was making some people rich. It looked so good it was said, “even the shoeshine boy was putting his money in the stock market.” When it crashed, overnight all that money disappeared. It must have gone in someone’s pocket?

Grandpa must have been a forgiving person because he and the banker remained friends. Grandpa didn’t put money -in any bank for a long time.
A little cloud hung over their friendship after that. Grandpa had recently sold some cows. He put the check in the Bank the day before the banks were all closed. Did his friend know advanced knowledge of that closing date? Could he have warned Grandpa, don’t put your check-in this Bank? Grandpa being the forgiving and loving person he was, always gave him the benefit of the doubt. He often said, “human greed” destroyed many people.

The controllers of the nation’s wealth may have been planning our future of credit card spending after the banks closed. They now have almost everybody buying with credit cards and we became their slaves. People depend on credit cards for daily existence. Big money actually killed the work incentive in this nation with EZ credit for low-income people. It is going to be hard to get that old work ethic back.

I believe my grandparents got put on this Earth to spread God’s love to all the people they met. Wherever they went to visit, they always brought something with them to give to the neighbors. They greeted everyone with the words “Gods Peace.” They understood and lived to love thy neighbor.

My dad told me about a new neighbor moving into the area one time. The stranger asked Grandpa, “What kind of people live around here? Grandpa asked him, “what kind of people lived where you came from?” The man described different people all had problems. Grandpa said, “You will find the same kind of people here.”

You might say I love my neighbor, but I hate his politics. You can say that and more because you live in America where you enjoy FREE speech. The new Trump slogan is” Rather be Russian than a democrat.” That means you don’t want freedom, that makes you a traitor! Have you served the United States in the military? If you have, you would never make such an idiotic statement. If that is your real feeling, you should not be living here. You should be living in Russia or another country with a dictator, they will tell you what type of politics you will have.

If you live in America, you have the choice to decide which way you want to go. No political party has all the right answers; we must work together for the good of all citizens. Calling each other names belittling others lying about others is tearing the country apart. We must all work together if we expect to have a free society where all men are created equal.
Our forefathers would be disgusted with the childish ways and mess that has been created after all the suffering and sacrifice they endured.

The Republican party has Played Dirty politics for decades. They’re running out of tricks in their playbook. They are now trying to scare the voters into believing the Democratic party will turn this nation into a socialist state.

It appears to me that’s what the GOP goal is, control over everything. It’s not the Democratic Party that refuses to work with the other side.

It is a two-way street, but the Republicans have played it is my way or the highway for 40 years. They vowed not to help President Obama get anything done! I feel it is time for those my way or highway Boys to hit the road. Let young people in to run the government, people who will work for the nation’s good, not just the top wealth holders.

The wealth can only trickle down if the greedy loses their death grip on it.

More thoughts for the voters.

There was little or no income in the USA agricultural community in 1929. Credit was not used to buy things. People saved, and every extra Penny they had was in the bank to get saved for a rainy day. Most of these pioneers had nothing when they arrived, so they treasured everything they acquired. You made your way in this world. You did not look for handouts.

The powers-that-be created the Wall Street Crash that closed the banks. The little bit of money the hard-working people had saved got taken away. The GOP still believed you pull yourself up by your bootstraps even after they took your boots. You should; do the honorable thing stay home and die if you get sick or do like the ancient Eskimo tribes. When you get too old to be productive or bring in food. You should walk out alone and sit there until you freeze to death.

In our part of the USA, if you had no money or home, there were poor houses in the 1930s where you could stay. They had no Bathrooms or running water. They maybe had one faucet so people could get drinking water. The smell of human waste was overwhelming and bed bugs were everywhere. My dad used to say people living there lived longer because they remained active, killing bed bugs.

Franklin Delano Roosevelt thought the condition of our senior citizens was bad. He devised the Social Security plan. The Republican party fought against it. They did not believe we should have a social system of any kind in this country.

The Republicans also fought against the Medicare system, but after it became law. They passed a bill ‘in the middle of the night’ that would make trillions of dollars for the drug companies.

We need some new blood, young people with common sense to take control of the Helm of our ship of State. It’s about ready to crash into a rock pile.

The way the Republican Party acts today, they would like to see us join Putin’s Communism they want to control everything. Now they’re using the new flip flop platform. Turn it around, have voters believe the Democrats will turn us into a socialist country. If they flip flop the same lie long enough nobody will know it.

The Republican party has a long track record for the use of dirty political campaigns. I will enclose a quote about one of their young early professional poop peddlers, Lee Atwater.

“In 1988,” Mr. Atwater said, “fighting Dukakis, I said that I ‘would strip the bark off the little bastard’ and ‘make Willie Horton his running mate.’ I am sorry for both statements: the first for its naked cruelty, the second because it makes me sound racist, which I am not.” Reputation as ‘Ugly Campaigner'”
“Since being stricken last year, the 39-year-old Mr. Atwater has apologized on several occasions for many of the campaign tactics he once employed and for which he was criticized. But rarely has he spoken in such detail or with such candor as in the interview for the first-person Life article.”

The GOP party leaders giving the marching orders today, spreading lies, rumors and hateful division make Lee Atwater look like a quiet, little Sunday school teacher.

The GOP’s hope.
“Voters quickly forget what a man says.” —President Richard Nixon.

The Republican Party and the Religious Right is positive God has sent Donald Trump to save this country from the terrible Democrats.


I find that hard to believe unless God and the New Religious Right operate by spreading hate through lies, fear, and intimidation.


I have always thought God does his work through love.

The Bay Area Bad Guys “Audio”

I know some of you on ‘Facebook’ and ‘My Mixed Blog’ are interested in the Bay Area Bad Guys as an audiobook.

The virus has left the publishers over a month behind, but my novel has finally come out in an audio version.

Click on the link below for Amazon.

Leland Olson – amazon.com

Click this link for Audible. Use the promo codes and write a review . Promo codes allow listeners to download your ACX audiobook for free from Audible

I f you want a promo code, I will send one.

Make sure to direct fans and reviewers to www.audible.com/acx-promo or www.audible.co.uk/acx-promo to redeem ACX promo codes, and remind them to mention that they received a free copy in exchange for an honest review.

https://www.audible.com/pd/The-Bay-Area-Bad-Guys-Audiobook/B08GQD8962?asin=B08GQD8962

Happy reading and listening, thank you everyone.

https://lelandolson.com/

VOTE-End Times-VOTE

        

“Jesus alerts his disciples not to be deceived by the false prophets, who will claim themselves as being Christ, performing “great signs and wonders”.

How then should a person who professes to be a Christian live his daily life? Should he try to do things that will hurry up the end? Should you do what is wrong ‘in your own mind’ if you think it will bring about the end sooner? We live in a world controlled by man’s laws and elected officials.

How should that affect the way you vote? Do you vote for people who do not treat their neighbors as they would want to be treated? Is it right or wrong to vote for people who show no sign of loving their neighbor? Human nature prods us to speed up the end-time prophecy? It reminds me of early church history and cold jumpers.

I do not want to jeopardize my place near the cross by voting for what I know in my heart is wrong!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antichrist

In Christian eschatology, the Antichrist, or anti-Christ, is a person prophesied by the Bible to oppose Christ and substitute himself in Christ’s place before the Second Coming. The term (including one plural form)[1] is found five times in the New Testament, solely in the First and Second Epistle of John.[2] The Antichrist is announced as the one “who denies the Father and the Son.”[3]
” The similar term pseudokhristos or “false Christ” is found in the Gospels. In Matthew (chapter 24) and Mark (chapter 13),

https://lelandolson.com/

Brainwashed by Social Media

The United States military leaders got told by the politicians in 1959, about the Domino theory, all the countries in Southeast Asia will fall to communism like domino’s if we don’t stop them in Vietnam. We are trading partners with all of them today. President Trump met with North Korea’s Communist leader at Hanoi, “a real slap in the face to all POW’s.”

Communism hasn’t spread very far unless that’s what is happening today by undermining our political processes and causing a bitter division of the people, through corrupt elections. We won’t remain free for many more years when the country is divided by hate groups. We have remained a free Democracy by working together regardless of differences of opinion. The good and survival of all in the “United States must be the goal.”

It now appears as if those days are coming to an end, right, wrong, law and order have little meaning. It may not have been communist conspired but the voters have been brainwashed by propaganda that has flooded all of todays Social Media platforms. The Republican Party destroyed Hilary Clinton’s reputation with lies and robbed her of being president of the United States. Their plan is to now steal the 2020 election the same way. Their goal is to divide and control voters, all for power and profit. God help America.

The Estensen family Reunion

As a youngster my grandparents Andrew and Minnie Olson attended the Estensen family reunion as often as there was one held in the community. I came across a newspaper clipping from a reunion that was at Lake Campbell near Brookings SD, decided to share this with my blogging friends. I’m sure there are many names for everyone to remember. I recall attending with my grandparents, even as a youngster it was a fun event. My wife and I attended our last Estenson reunion it Renner South Dakota in the early 1970s.



Family reunion were annual events at one time, or as close to annual as you could get. Reunions seem to be out of style in many families today. My wife came from a large family in Michigan and she loved to return to the family reunions in July as often as we could. I realized those reunions were very important to her so we attended often, even though it was a long drive. This year she didn’t want to wait until July so she went to the reunion in April, not to Michigan but that Huge Glorious Reunion where the streets are paved with gold. There is an eternal reunion with friends and family waiting, that is truly out of this world.

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Real Music

I have known this country music legend since we were teenagers and caddies at the Watertown Country Club, near Watertown South Dakota. Sherwin devoted his entire life to entertaining people with real music, Country Music. Listen and enjoy or visit him at one of the places on his schedule

To Don and Kay.

http://www.sherwinlinton.com/schedule.asp

http://sherwinlinton.com/

A Surprise Visitor

Great grandfather Ole Olson at Crimson Lake, Alberta Canada
Ole Olson with two early health care
providers

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This was a writing assignment on JANUARY 10, 2016 / LELAND OLSON HOEL 

If one of your late ancestors were to come back from the dead and join you for dinner, what things about your family would this person find the most shocking?

Family Dinner Out

Somebody in our family got the idea a while back that it would be just great if we all got together and had dinner out. Of course, the first question that came up, where to eat? Some wanted to go to McDonald’s, and others wanted a Chinese buffet. We had a few younger ones voted for Italian. One grandson with an Asian wife wanted Japanese sushi. I shouted, “this is getting us nowhere. We are all going to go to Ralph’s Gizzard Kitchen and pull a few tables together and enjoy a family dinner.”

We finally got seated at Ralph’s Place. I ask, “how about ordering.” Each one wanted to order from the menu by themselves. Immediately I said, “No way, José, that is not going to work. It will drain my bank account.” We can all have the special, and I will pick up the check. If each one wants to order separately, we will share the cost. No one wanted the special, as I thought, with a breath of relief. Orders finally were all placed; waitresses started bringing out all the different meals.

Everyone was relaxing and enjoying their meals when we heard some police siren’s out in front. Pretty soon, a policeman walked in the door with this big old fellow, who looked like a lumberjack. The policeman asked, “Is somebody here named Leland Olson.” That’s me, I replied.” The policeman says, “This old geezer was wandering around in the middle of the street looking for a restaurant called Ralph’s Gizzard Kitchen. Nobody in town seemed to know where it was.” Whoever picked this place to eat must not get out of the house much! So anyway, “This fellow claims to be the great-grandfather of Leland Olson. He got the message to meet everyone here for a family dinner.”

I jumped up and gave my great-grandpa a big old hug, you look great, you died in 1914. I started banging a glass with my spoon. Can I have everyone’s attention, “This is great-grandpa Ole Hoel, he came from Canada to have dinner with us.” Sit down and join us. So, “how have things been going with you, grandpa, what would you like to eat?” Salted herring and lutefisk are out of season right now. They have excellent walleye fillets. I heard you always liked fish; we all did. Grandpa said, “That will be just fine, “but I don’t seem to have the appetite I had working in the woods all day.”

I asked, “How long can you stay,” They said, ‘until dinner is over,’ “I thought maybe you could come out to the house and stay awhile.” ‘Well, that is not part of the deal.’ I’m here to have dinner with you and your family, to see how you all look and act.’ “Frankly, I am shocked. It appears like you all have a lot of confusion and bad manners.” “You should be eating at one table in your home.” ‘Grandpa things change.’ He says, “Don’t know why things got to change that much, only been a little over a 100 years or so since I left here.”

So I asked him, “If you’re leaving after dinner, I hope you’re not walking back to Rocky Mountain House, Alberta.” No way, “Walk that far, you nuts? I did it once in 1905! “I will be returned to Canada the same way I got here. Something beamed me up. I didn’t have my Derby hat, so they beamed me back down, got my hat, and beamed me up again, then brought me here. I hope they get it right, going back.”

Thanks for supper, it was nice to meet your family. Leland, What did you say you do? Blogging? Never heard of it, “Now logging, I know a lot about log………

Bye, bye, great-grandpa. I love you.

I have always felt a closeness to all my grandfathers. My great grandfather, Ole Estensen Hoel, was born on December 2, 1816. I was born on December 1, 1940. Grandpa Ole Hoel was born on April 28, 1844.

Families throughout this world have become more fractured as cyber societies progress at warp speed. The family unit in the United States no longer resembles what it was in the past. Each generation for the past few decades. Has seen the values change. The ties that bind families together have been destroyed or continue to decline.  

It will be a terrible price to pay, but possibly this Coronavirus will help reverse a trend that was destroying the family unit worldwide. No matter how horrible a situation looks. There can always be a brighter side found If we search hard enough for it. A new world of fellowship and brotherly love might be in the making. 

https://lelandolson.com/

Mother / Cat

princess
Princess at Kitchen Table

I have to laugh my furry little old butt off at times. They talk to me like I’m a person but those two still think I’m a cat! Lee is such a pushover, I knew if I acted real sickly and underfed he would bring me into the house and that’s exactly what he did, many, many years ago. Rose is gentle and filled with love, as every good mother should be, she is my baby.

I worry about Rose, her health hasn’t been very good lately, she is suffering from every lung condition in the books, along with diabetes, even dementia. That makes days very hard for her, so I try to be really nice to her and show her lots of love and affection. I sleep by her feet all night and always sit on her lap in the recliner, she pets me constantly.

Lee doesn’t seem to be the Rock Hudson, she thought she was getting when she married him way, way back. I love to just sit with Rose and I know my presence makes her feel good, which is very comforting to me. She yells at me at times, about not to do certain things but I know she doesn’t really mean it. She hollers, “watch your claws a lot,” while I make biscuits on her stomach, or scratch the furniture. That’s what cats do, for crying ‘meow’ out loud!

Lee is always coming up with special names for me like Dumb cat, or Damn cat, my name is Princess. I have a Royal Countenance about me, everyone can see that. If Rose asks, “Did you feed Princess?” He always says something really dumb, like, ‘have you got an alligator?’ He thinks his so-called Terms of Endearment are really cute. When he does these things I have something special for him. I have the power to make a sore pop out in either one of his nostrils, or both, like an ingrown hair and it will stay sore for 3 or 4 days. I could put a boil on his butt too. He is very fortunate, I did like him a little at one time.

The hair on my back almost stands straight up when he forgets to empty the cat box on time, which seems to be quite regular. I thought he was going to have a heart attack one day, I pretended to do my job next to the Box. I got a big laugh out of that one. He was screaming at Rose, “Your cat is peeing on the floor.” Rose knew better because she knows me and trusts me in a special way. Lee asked, “Why has it been my job to empty the cat box since day one?” You brought her to the house! Why should I be punished for doing a good deed?

My tired, sore old body was still in bed at 9:00 AM today. I had a busy, half scary, long night thinking about our families, my own and my wife’s family, and the many cats our families have had through the years.

This following message came to me in a dream. My mother-in-law passed away at age 80, that was approximately 17 years ago. She did make a promise to me, it was something like this. If there was a way, ‘she would make life very uncomfortable for me, if I didn’t treat her daughter Rose right.’ It was more or less a threat. No, It was a threat, “You be good to my baby girl or you will have no peace and rest in your lifetime.

It then hit me, I brought princess into the house 17 years ago, shortly after my mother-in-law passed away. It surely can’t be possible! Did she come back as Princess? Her hair was snow-white, like the cat. If that is the case she wasn’t in limbo long, that is understandable, the keeper of the gate just looked the other way.

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Rose, “I will feed Princess and take the cat box out right now.”

https://lghoelson.wordpress.com/

Lake Poinsett Nostalgia

Photo Challenge
Nostalgia

What kinds of experiences stir emotions for the past within you?

Lake Poinsett Nostalgia

The word that was suggested for the one-word prompt recently was nostalgia. It was a photo challenge, but the photos I’m using here are not current. The beautiful lake named Lake Poinsett in northeastern South Dakota is where I will take you on my nostalgia trip. I was born in 1940 and grew up witnessing many changes at the lake. With this post, I hope to take a short trip back down memory lane and recall different things about Lake Poinsett. It has seen dramatic changes in usage, population, residences, year around homes, food, drink, bait and tackle places and a multitude of water level changes.

We lived on a farm less than a mile south of the lake, our parents were Frank and Frances Olson. A lot of time was spent either fishing or swimming in our lives. Our great uncle Simon Hoel built a stone house on the hill just east of the park in 1885, part of it still stands. My grandfather Andrew Olson helped him farm the land.

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Simon Hoel Olson home 1880’s

 

Tall, virgin prairie grass grew for a mile along the south shore of the lake. Simon and my grandfather cut hay from it for forty years. There is a beautiful state park on that land today, trees and campgrounds everywhere.

A few tall original cottonwood trees were growing along the shoreline but through the centuries ice knocked most of them down. A wagon trail can still be seen in places, it went to the east boundary fence and on for another mile to the Hendrickson farm, what is now Runia’s farm. There were no homes or cabins on any of that land.

Just to the west of the State Park property, there was a very lively, noisy dance hall named Smith’s place. It flourished in the late 1800s and early 1900s. It was a very lively dance hall, where many big name bands played as they traveled through this area. We knew Charlie Smith the owner and his family very well. Their daughter babysat the three Olson boys on occasion.Karlton, Harlan, and Leland. My brother Harlan was a banker, writer, and collector of artifacts who helped start the Museum at the state park entrance. Harlan loved every minute of it, even the many volunteer hours. He passed away on March 8, 2016. I can see him searching for artifacts on old Heavenly terrain now. I would imagine there are some very nice artifacts to be found near those streets of gold.

Smith’s dance hall and the property was all sold to the Methodist Church, they may have become the first church to have a beer license. The original dance hall building where Lawrence Welk played still stands, in the same place on that stretch of shoreline. Today it is used for meetings and as a dining hall, that says something for old-time construction.

Arlington Beach, the next place west was run by a lady named Ann Oburn. This picture is of the Lake Poinsett water slide in the 1920’s. I think it was located at Arlington Beach, as far as I can tell from looking at the Hills and the trees in the background. I will be glad to edit this story and change the location if it is wrong. Ann Oburn had a few rental cabins, cafe and bait house.

Bud Mueller from Estelline gave boat rides at Arlington Beach in the 1940’s. This was his fancy boat.

In the nineteen forties or early fifties it was purchased by Russ Weiland and his wife who operated it for many years. Russ was possibly the original Evinrude Johnson dealer in this part of the country. His daughter and son-in-law relocated Weiland Marine, which is now on Highway 81.

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West from there were only two or three houses until you got to the little hill top farm with the goats. I think Madsens lived there. There were only two cabins between there and Mundt’s Resort. Mundt’s had several small cabins that they rented out. There was a farm between Mundt’s resort and what is now Pier 81.

There was another dance hall that later became Wieland Marine on Highway 81 just north of the corner by the Poinsett Cemetery, it closed after the War. It was near a gas station, some called Hilltop, others Ann’s Place.  She served lunches and usually had a lively crowd, Ann and Clyde served beverages to those with the most discriminating tastes. The place later became Ole’s repair shop. It was Gene’s repair until Weiland Marine bought it.

Ernie Edwards moved a building to the lake and started Edwards resort, possibly in the late 40s early 50s. Edwards served good food and had a bar and live music.
Edwards Resort had dances through the 50s 60s and 70s mainly Country Western and Rock and Roll music. They usually had very good crowds. I believe it was sometime in the 1960’s a truck driver must have gone to sleep at the wheel and he tipped his semi over in Edwards parking lot wrecking cars and almost taking out the gas pumps. I can’t imagine the call that fellow had to make to his company explaining he just wrecked a few dozen cars while tipping over at a crowded dance. I was there that night I recall there was a lot of commotion. It was a miracle that no one was even hurt, many people were outside.

On the west side of the Lake, there was a resort called Sportsmans Lodge owned by Nessen’s, the Hawley family was there too, it burned down. It was a very long large building with a restaurant, I believe they also had cabins and rooms in the lodge that they rented out.

What is now Lakeview Resort was a small resort opened by Ole Mikelmier. It later became Fish Haven, home of the famous Carp Sandwich. They had a secret BBQ sauce, It brought out the best in a big chunk of carp. From Lakeview North, there were two or three homes.

The Grape Farm had no homes until the first one was built right on the point in the 1950s. From there North to Saarinen’s the state purchased part of the shoreline and later sold Lots to private owners. That closed it for skinny dipping. From Saarinen’s Point North there were a few homes because it was close to the highway.

Nitteberg’s Resort was just east of the Stonebridge. That highway washed out west of the bridge in the spring of 1969 as flood waters from over a hundred inches of snow came in from the river and Dry Lake.

Nittebergs must have had a couple dozen summer cabins that they rented out along with boats and bait. They also had some carnival rides in the summer months and afternoon roller skating in the dance hall. The dance hall was built over the lake at one time, but ice damage made them move it back to shore. It was a family run business.The brothers John and Clair ran the bar and maintained most jukeboxes, pinball and other game machines in a large area, their sisters operated the cafe.

The Dance Hall was very busy and a lively location during the 50’s and 60’s and into the 70’s. There was all types of music, old time music was the most popular for many years, until Rock and Roll moved in. There were many big-name bands playing at Nittebergs Resort in the early years, the Model T and Model A days. Lawrence Welk who was from Strasburg N D played there in his younger days. Miron Florin from Rosholt South Dakota managed the Welk music when Lawrence stepped down.

Leo Fortin’s Orchestra was a regular at Nitteberg’s Stone Bridge Resort for many years.

LEO FORTIN

Leo Fortin

They had Thursday night dances in the fifties. I recall our football coach at Castlewood kept telling us “you guys have a good football team but just think how much better you would be if you didn’t spend all night at the dance on Thursday night.” I guess he had a good point there.

We danced a lot to Big Tiny Little’s Band who played with The Lawrence Welk Orchestra. He was born in Worthington Minnesota and was a regular there in the 50s and 60s.

BIG TINY LITTLE (2)

Dry Lake was north of The Stone Bridge. In the dryer years, it was full of muskrat houses. The Game Warden Ed White with his Smokey the Bear Hat would fire a shotgun to open the trapping season. From what I have heard it was like the Boomer Sooner land rush in Oklahoma. Trappers made a mad dash to claim as many muskrat houses as they could.

The County’s had a bounty on pocket gophers at one time. It was rumored that some entrepreneurial muskrat Trappers took the front paws from their muskrats and turned them in to claim pocket gopher bounty in the spring.

When you went east from Nittebergs cabins, there were only one or two houses, the one right below the hill was named ‘The Mouse Turd Inn.” The west side of that hill was real steep, just a dirt trail going straight up, many Model A’s some Model T’s, later newer cars had drivers who challenged each other to make it to the top. The dust really flew! I think some got sideways on occasion and rolled back down the hill.

The resort on top of the hill was known as Jim Bagley’s place. A long wooden staircase went down the hill to the lake. They also had a café, fishing equipment, and bait. The name was changed to the Hilltop Resort later when owned by Louie Morales and his family. Louie rented out boats at Thomas Lake one summer when perch fishing was hot.

Just down the hill, east of the hilltop resort, there were three or four homes before you got to Hammer’s pasture and to the outlet of Lake Poinsett, that led to Stark’s Bridge where flood gates were installed. There have been several fish winterkill years when oxygen in the lake got so low most of the fish died. Dead fish in windrows around the lake at one time. The worst spring brought out the National Guard with front-end loaders, trucks and lots of shovels.

The Bakke farm and Cemetery took up most of the east shore. Two homes were on the hill overlooking Prestrude’s Landing. Lots were developed and cabins built to the south of the boat landing in the 1950’s. Goulds opened a beer and bait place there in the late forties but it didn’t last. The next mile of shoreline was only recently developed by the Hansen family. Going south from the Hansen development to Hendricksons or now Runia’s there were two cabins.

This has been a rather selfish nostalgic trip around Lake Poinsett. I’m really young to have nostalgia for the water slide or for the swimming attire. So actually I feel a lot younger by taking this trip back just a few years before my time. I thought I would like to share these memories of Lake Poinsett while I’m still able to share them. The changes at Lake Poinsett are hard to imagine if you didn’t witness them. The number of very large homes today must reflect a great prosperity in this country or something?

At night the lake and all of the country side was darker than pitch, this was in 1945, before REA, no all night yard lights, no electric lights period. We played cards with light from a kerosene lamp on the table. This country at night was a whole lot darker, the small glow in the sky to the west was Lake Norden’s lights. The smaller glow to the east was Estelline in the Sioux River bottom. You could barely make out a tiny glow for Brookings, that was a long way off. You might say nights were a bonus for ghosts and goblins in those days. On a night with no moon or stars, you best hope your lantern did not go dry.  Can you imagine going back to live in those times?

NOVEMBER 15, 2016 / LELAND OLSON HOEL / EDITbeach-bunnies

Swimming attire has gone from one extreme to the other throughout the centuries. In classical antiquity, swimming and bathing were done naked. The swimming suits here from the 1920’s seem a wee bit extreme, the weight of the wet swim suit could pull you under. Now close to 100 years later we saw, peered, peeked our way through the teeny weeny, polka dot bikini era, we are almost back to swimming in the nude again.

What goes around comes around, with nostalgia or Murphy’s Law.

http://www.lelandolson.com/

Out of Your Reach

Taken by Edmond Wayrynen

In response to The Daily Post’s writing prompt: “Out of Your Reach.”

DAILY PROMPT

Out of Your Reach

Was there a toy or thing you always wanted as a child, during the holidays or on your birthday, but never received? Tell us about it.

Thanks for the suggestion, Jen Rosenberry!

There was one thing that I always wanted as a kid but never received. Many birthdays and Christmas days came and went, but what I was searching for was never there. I could understand that they were relatively expensive, and it was just something that children in lower-income families didn’t get to play with often. I was fortunate to have a friend George Hestead whose parents even had a big sailboat. I hope I didn’t become friends with him because he owned Lionel Train sets. He had the most massive train set I have ever seen. It got spread over one whole room in his house. I can hardly describe it, almost enough track to get to Chicago. He had depots, bridges, tunnels, railroad crossings, flashing lights, smoke coming out of the engines. It was indeed awe, inspiring site for my young mind. I spent a lot of time at his house. He didn’t mind letting me share in his wealth, and it was a lot of fun. It would have been easy to covet that neighbor’s trains!

In 1949 my brothers Corky and Harlan and I rode the passenger train from Bryant to Watertown with mom. My love for trains made that a particularly, memorable day. We later learned it was a special day for sure. Our parents were in the process of getting a divorce. Our big house got sold, we said tearful goodbyes to our pigeons. Mother soon moved us to Watertown. That was a monumental change in lifestyle. We learned to tend a large garden before doing anything else, and do some cleaning and cooking. Cloths washing water was pumped by hand and heated on the gas stove in a washtub with lye soap cut into it. Harlan ran his arm up to the elbow in the ringer one day. Mother suggested we use more care after that.

Watertown was a busy railroad center. I soon concluded, I now had my train set, full size. We would go down by the tracks and play around the different trains while switching cars and being moved around, and changing engines. Oh, what a time I had! We occasionally hopped a ride, hanging onto the side of a car and riding for a way, that was quite an adrenaline rush. As we got braver, we rode out to the edge of town then jumped off before the train got going too fast. We walked back to town, walked everywhere in those days. A lot of men were out of work and hopped rides on trains everywhere. There was a hobo camp near the river, north of Riverside Park. They were mostly a friendly group and shared their meager meals with us.

We were living in the days before electronic games and TV, so we made our entertainment. One of my favorite places was the old roundhouse, where those big steam locomotives got turned around and sent back in the other direction. I would crawl down and hide underneath the turntable and watch all the action going on up above. Those were exciting and scary times. The railroad people were always trying to chase us away, but I think they probably concluded. Those kids don’t have much to go home for and overlooked some of our presence there. We were always careful. I remember any time we crawled underneath a train to get across the tracks. We were very, very careful. My brother and I still have all of our legs today, and some reasonably unusual memories. 

One of the railroad workers who lived next to the tracks was Sherwin Linton’s father. When he was motioning for me to get away from the trains, he didn’t realize that little hooligan would later become friends with his son Sherwin.

Ice got harvested by a large crew at Lake Kampeska all winter. There was a huge ice house at the lake and another one in town. They supplied ice for everyone during the long hot summer. Both were popular places to play on hot days. Ice got cut into huge blocks then stored in the ice houses with layers of sawdust in between.

Mother rented a house on the south side of Lake Kampeska one time. That is when I met George and his prized railroad system. We started to caddy at the Country Club, that’s where I met Sherwin Linton. He was the only caddy with a guitar. That old Tennessee Flat Top Box has served him well. He still maintains a tour schedule plus plays at county and State Fairs. At 80 years young he appears energetic and still plays great.

I love my trains but will stay away from the tracks when I see 

“The Long Black Train” coming.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=josh+turner+long+black+train&docid=60803607182409939

 

https://lelandolson.com/

Lake Poinsett, South Dakota, USA

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Fishing was usually good.

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Our old cabin

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Amber fish

Amber’s alligator !

 

 

 

 

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24 lb. Northern Pike

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36.5 lb. Carp

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The Olson boys L/R Leland, Karlton, Harlan

 

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2011 was another year of high water level, wind damage.

 

 

 

HATE

Hi neighbor,
We share this planet earth so I believe we are all neighbors.

It is now the year 2020 but we left many loved ones behind. There are people who deny the Holocaust ever happened.

Some countries have done what they call ethnic cleansing by killing their cousins.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethnic_cleansing

The movie Mississippi Burning depicts what happened in the state of Mississippi, the USA in the 1960s.

History has repeated itself many times in the past. This election year we must think seriously about how we vote. We do not want to set the hate thy neighbor gears in motion to repeat the horrible atrocities humans have done to each other in the past.

The United States was a democracy. It is supposed to be a democratic form of government. There’ has always been the Republican Party, the Democratic Party, and the independent party.

When President Obama got elected to office, the Republican Party’s leadership swore they would do absolutely nothing that would help his presidency. We started losing our democratic form of government at that time.

Today, with social media, hate groups are encouraged to act, creating division in the country. Four years ago, the nation got divided by lies spread on social networks. The country recently got more divided over the Coronavirus, wearing a mask or not, global warming, even the reason for forest fires etc. The leaders want this country devided to control it better.

The greatest commandment in the bible is Love Thy Neighbor. Hate has divided the country. If you love your neighbor today, you’re considered a wimp.

The president considers Russia his friend, and the Democratic party his enemy. A few decades ago, democrats were called liberal as a derogative term. Today they are also called socialistic, left-wing radicals, terrorists. This un-American slander continues to be spread all of the world through social media. If this continues, our form of government and our legal system will collapse.

The voters must put the citizens back in control of government. It is time for the “my way or the highway politicians” to hit the road.

The Greatest Commandment
…30 Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength.’ 31The second is this: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ No other commandment is greater than these.

If you say I love my neighbor, I just hate his politics. You should not be living in the United States, you should be living in Russia, the leader decides your politics for you.

They love Trump
and Russia

In this country we work together for the good of all the citizens living here.

Soldiers have to torture and murder people under orders from their hate-filled commanding officers, here is a good example of that.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_12th_Man_(film)

Naked Truth

A needed message of truth.

lifelessons - a blog by Judy Dykstra-Brown


His truths are vile graffiti scrawled in charcoal on a wall,

your belief in them, immobile—not budgeable at all.
You spout online rhetoric not based on any fact,
using a selfish tyrant to pattern how you act.

I simply cannot understand people of your kind.
Will any foul deed propagated pry open your mind?
Fire, tempest, pestilence—what further natural curse
will finally persuade you that it’s only getting worse?

Divide and conquer is his game, and he’ll use any means
for engineering chaos and creating scenes
matching brother against brother till our nation rips apart.
Destroying all it stood for. Ripping out its heart.

What quality does he display that moves you all to court him?
What single act for common men leads you to support him?
Children kenneled up like animals? Men shot because they’re black?
One-by-one his sane advisers all given the sack?

Our emperor has no clothes…

View original post 64 more words

Pionsett Pioneers

Lars Levi Laestadius

Early Apostolic Preacher in Finland Sweden and Lapland

Today’s South Dakota, with a population of about 770,000, looks very different from the South Dakota of 1889. Prior to statehood and widespread settlement, the area supported a thriving American Indian population that hunted and traded with each other and with the trappers who had followed the rivers. The Indians followed and hunted buffalo herds, planted gardens, dug prairie roots, and picked wild fruits to sustain themselves. There were few white settlers.

Why They Came
the Lewis & Clark Expedition of 1804-1806 provided early information about the land that would become Dakota Territory. From the 1840s through the 1860s, over 250,000 settlers moved west along the California, Oregon, and Mormon Trails that ran south of Dakota Territory through Nebraska. Relatively few of this “Great Migration” came north into Dakota Territory, but some did. By 1870, the South Dakota area of Dakota Territory had a population of 11,776.

The 1860 U.S. Census, taken in unorganized Dakota Territory, gave a population count of 4,837.

Social and religious pressures, wars, and famines in Europe drove many to seek better fortunes in America. The Homestead Act of 1862, with its promise of 160 acres of free land, attracted many immigrants. The railroads also played a big part in the settlement of Dakota.
In October 1872, the first rail line crossed the Big Sioux River into Dakota Territory at Yankton.
Railroads grew rapidly, bringing in goods and settlers. In the next two decades, a network of rails blanketed eastern Dakota. Other lines moved into the Black Hills to service its growing population. Railroads owned a great deal of property and they needed people to buy and settle on the land.
Along with newspaper editors, land agents, and government officials, railroad companies used every tactic to entice settlers. “This is the sole remaining paradise in the western world,” they said, “Come to Dakota and get yourself a farm!”
Many early settlers located near military forts for protection. Early Norwegians settled near a fort close to present-day Sioux Falls, using both the protection it offered and the wooded areas that grew along the Great Sioux River.

Custer’s military expedition through the Black Hills in 1874 uncovered
another reason to come to Dakota Territory: Gold! The Indians had been promised the Black Hills by the 1868 Laramie Treaty, but nothing could stop the push for gold. Waves of miners and other Danes who arrived were largely literate, due to compulsory education laws in Denmark. Viborg celebrates its heritage each year on the third weekend in July at Danish Festival Days.

“Finnish immigrants were not numerous in South Dakota, never comprising more than one-half of one percent of the state’s population. In 1878, Pastor Torsten Estensen and his Apostolic Lutheran followers established Poinsett, in northern Brookings County. About 200 Finns came to that area between 1878 and 1890. Torsten came from Hedmark Norway with his cousin Simon Hoel. They both lived in Calumet Michigan when they first arrived in America. They worked in the copper mines, married and both started families there in Michigan before coming West to Dakota Territory. Torsten and Simon were instrumental in starting the Apostolic Church near Lake Poinsett and Lake Norden.”

A Finnish emigrant agent, Kustaa Frederick Bergstadius, started Finn
settlement in Savo Township in Brown County in 1882. The area soon had two churches, a lending library, temperance society, and brass band. Finns settled in concentrated groups, possibly because their language was so different from that of other Scandinavian immigrants. The gold rush
also brought Finnish miners to the Black Hills. Lead had 1,300 Finnish, mostly young and unmarried men, by 1900. Many Finnish miners would later marry and settle in rural communities throughout Harding, Lawrence, and Perkins counties.

“Arne Mackey’s father was an early miner at Lead.

https://lelandolson.com/

My Maternal Grandparents

Charles and Minnie Wayrynen
Charlie’s birthplace.

Suomussalmi is a municipality in Finland and is located in the Kainuu region. The municipality has a population of 7,881 (31 January 2019)[2] and covers an area of 5,857.60 square kilometres (2,261.63 sq mi) of which 587.03 km2 (226.65 sq mi) is water.[1] The population density is 1.5 inhabitants per square kilometre (3.9/sq mi). The municipality is unilingually Finnish. Ämmänsaari is the biggest built-up area in the municipality.

Suomussalmi is the second southernmost part of the reindeer-herding area in Finland. Kalevala Russia is next door, grandpa always said, Can’t trust those Russians.”

During the Winter War of 1939–40, several battles were fought in the area around Suomussalmi, the most important ones being the Battle of Suomussalmi and the Battle of Raate. In these battles Finnish forces defeated numerically superior Soviet forces.

The Battle of Suomussalmi was a battle fought between Finnish and Soviet forces in the Winter War. The action took place from around December 7, 1939, to January 8, 1940. The outcome was a Finnish victory against superior forces. Suomussalmi is considered the clearest, most important, and most significant Finnish victory in the northern half of Finland.[3] In Finland, the battle is still seen today as a symbol of the entirety of Winter War itself.

On November 30, 1939, the Soviet 163rd Rifle Division crossed the border between Finland and the Soviet Union and advanced from the north-east towards the village of Suomussalmi. The Soviet objective was to advance to the city of Oulu, effectively cutting Finland in half. This sector had only one Finnish battalion (Er.P 15), which was placed near Raate, outside Suomussalmi.

Suomussalmi was taken with little resistance on December 7 (only two incomplete companies of covering forces led a holding action between the border and Suomussalmi), but the Finns destroyed the village before this, to deny the Soviets shelter, and withdrew to the opposite shore of lakes Niskanselkä and Haukiperä.

The first extensive fight started on December 8, when Soviet forces began to attack across the frozen lakes to the west. Their attempt failed completely. The second part of Soviet forces led the attack to the northwest on Puolanka, that was defended by the Er.P 16 (lit. 16th detached battalion), that had just arrived. This attempt also failed. On December 9, the defenders were reinforced with a newly founded regiment (JR 27). Colonel Hjalmar Siilasvuo was given the command of the Finnish forces and he began immediate counter-measures to regain Suomussalmi. The main forces advanced on Suomussalmi, but failed to take the village, suffering serious losses. On December 24, Soviet units counterattacked, but failed to break through the surrounding Finnish forces.

Reinforced with two new regiments (JR 64 and JR 65), the Finns again attacked on December 27. This time, they took the village, and the Soviets retreated in panic over the surrounding frozen lakes. A large part of them managed to reach the Russian border along the Kiantajärvi lake. During this time, the Soviet 44th Rifle Division had advanced from the east towards Suomussalmi. It was entrenched on the road between Suomussalmi and Raate and got caught up in the retreat of the other Soviet forces.

Between January 4 an The battle resulted in a major victory for the Finns. If the Soviet Union had captured the city of Oulu, the Finns would have had to defend the country on two fronts and an important rail link to Sweden would have been severed. The battle also gave a decisive boost to the morale of the Finnish army.

In addition, Finnish forces on the Raate-Suomussalmi road captured a large amount of military supplies, including tanks (43), field guns (71), trucks (260), horses (1,170), anti-tank guns (29) and other weapons, which were greatly needed by the Finnish army.

Alvar Aalto sculpted a memorial for the Finnish soldiers who died.[5]d January 8, 1940, the 44th Rifle Division was divided into isolated groups and destroyed by the Finnish troops (in a tactic known as motti), leaving much heavy equipment for the Finnish troops.

The Battle of Suomussalmi is often cited as an example of how a small force, properly led and fighting in familiar terrain, can defeat a vastly numerically superior enemy. Factors which contributed to the Finnish victory included:

Finnish troops possessed higher mobility due to skis and sleds; by contrast, Soviet heavy equipment confined them to roads.

The Soviet objective to cut Finland in half across the Oulu region, while appearing reasonable on a map, was inherently unrealistic, as the region was mostly forested marshland, with its road network consisting mainly of logging trails. Mechanized divisions had to rely on these, becoming easy targets for the mobile Finnish ski troops.

Finnish strategy was flexible and often unorthodox, for example, Finnish troops targeted Soviet field kitchens, which demoralised Soviet soldiers fighting in a sub-Arctic winter.

The Soviet army was poorly equipped, especially with regard to winter camouflage clothing; by contrast, Finnish troops’ equipment were well-suited for warfare in deep snow and freezing temperatures.

The Finnish army had very high morale, resulting from the fact that they were defending their nation. Soviet troops, however, possessed exclusively political reasons for their attack, consequently losing their will to fight soon despite continual efforts by Soviet propagandists.

An additional factor remained Soviet counter-intelligence failures: Finnish troops often intercepted the Soviet communications, which relied heavily on standard phone lines.

The Finnish tactics involved simplicity where needed, as the final assault was a simple head-on charge, decreasing the chances of tactical errors. Rough weather also favored comparatively simple plans.

Formula One racing driver Heikki Kovalainen is from Suomussalmi, as well as the author Ilmari Kianto and the composer Osmo Tapio Räihälä, in addition to the ice hockey player, Janne Pesonen.

Suomussalmi hosted the 2016 World Berry Picking Championship

Moving the Swedish Covenant Church 1908

Charlie made his living farming and doing custom work with his big steam engine. He moved buildings, did custom sod plowing and grain threshing. He and his wife Minnie had nine children, five sons served in the military. The church was moved into Lake Norden, South Dakota on huge wooden rollers from two miles out in the country, notice the railroad ties were new,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suomussalmi

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Suomussalmi

https://lelandolson.com/

Arizona Copper

When we lived in Tucson, Arizona, I drove for Arizona Tank Lines hauling fuel and gas in Southern and Eastern Arizona. I made a weekly trip to Globe, slow travel most of the way up to El Capitan Pass. The return trip was fast, and a lot of fun with no load.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arizona_State_Route_77

Most of my trips were to open-pit copper mines, sometimes delivering to skid tanks down in the mine. Some of those trips set the rear end to puckering, trying to eat a hole in the seat cover you might say. The ore trucks could have run over my rig like I was a bug.

Big truck

One time I stopped to check my tires before coming down the mountain from Oracle Junction. When I got started going again, a front tire blew out! New tires were put on the front the day before, and I got one that had a flaw in it. Talk about an angel riding shotgun. If that tire had blown going down the mountain with a full load, that would have been not nice. The mine at Oracle had a BIG storage tank, 8000 gallons made it raise 1/2 inch. One night west of there the road was covered with tarantulas after a storm. Running over rattlesnakes was routine, gives me the heebie-jeebies thinking about it. I will take South Dakota over any place.

The picture shows the cuts on the mountain grade near Clifton and Morenci, Arizona, taken in my rearview mirror. My truck just barely had power enough to go up that steep road. That is the oldest copper mining region in the nation.

My old truck
Open pit at Bisbee

I delivered to skid tanks all over this mine. It was near the Mexican border, we went there most of the time. I even saw a bunch of coati mindes near there one day.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coati

https://lelandolson.com/